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TensCare VIVA Pelvic Floor Exerciser

Product Code: SFBK-VIVA

In stock

$303.97

  • Revolutionary wire-free Pelvic Floor Exerciser with 4 pre-set and 2 manual programmes

  • The Viva is a pelvic floor trainer designed specifically for home use with clear controls to ensure that you feel comfortable

  • Programmes for stress, urge and mixed incontinence, to tone pelvic floor muscles and improve sexual intimacy

  • The probe provides gentle and comfortable stimulation whist enabling fine adjustment of the intensity level
    Easy to use colour touch screen

Description

Details

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Product Description
The Viva Wireless Pelvic Floor Exerciser uses Wi-Fi technology – controlling the vaginal trainer remotely from the main control unit – eliminating the need for wires and creating a more discreet user experience.

Key features of the Viva Pelvic Floor Exerciser include:
Wireless Vaginal Trainer – working remotely from the main control unit
Discreet – no wires ensure usage is completely hidden
Touch Screen – easy-to-use, modern, colour touch screen enabling quick access and control
Optional Programmes – 4 preset and 2 manual programmes for optimal choice
Personal Progress Diary – Built-in clock and detailed record of usage for progress reports
Optional PC Interface – to help you record and analyse your progress. Software can be downloaded here
Comfort Control – gentle, comfortable stimulation with fine-tune adjustment settings for levels of intensity
The Viva provides relief from 3 forms of incontinence:
Stress Incontinence describes the involuntary leakage of urine when a person coughs, sneezes, strains or makes sudden movements. It is particularly common in women and occurs when the bladder neck and the other mechanisms that act to hold urine in the bladder are not working properly.

Urge Incontinence describes an overactive bladder. A person may experience a strong and sudden urge to go to the toilet but are not always able to hold on, or have to go so frequently that it becomes inconvenient.

Mixed Incontinence is a combination of both Stress and Urge Incontinence.

Advantages of using the Viva:
• It can reduce leakage – not simply contain it. Most women see significant results in as little as 3 weeks.
• It is drug-free with no side effects.
• It is easy to use with preset programmes to suit your needs.
• It is discreet and can be used at home during your own time.
• It may help to avoid surgery
• It may improve sexual intimacy by toning your pelvic floor.

Please see ‘User Manuals’ for Technical Specifications.
Contraindications, Cautions and Warnings (Please carefully read the instructions before use)

Do NOT use the Viva pelvic floor exerciser under the following circumstances:
· If you have a heart pacemaker or a heart rhythm problem. Stimulation in the direct vicinity of a pacemaker may affect some models.
· If you are, or may be pregnant. It is not known whether electrical stimulation may affect foetal development.
· If you have been diagnosed or treated for cervical cancer. In vitro experiments have shown that electricity can promote cell growth.
· If you have or have had epilepsy. TENS may affect seizure threshold
· Do not use within 12 weeks of any surgery in the area of the vagina or nearby. Scars should be fully healed before use.

Cautions
· Whilst driving, or during any activity in which involuntary muscle contractions may put you at undue risk of injury. Sudden changes in contact may cause brief involuntary muscle movements
· If you have a metal coil IUD fitted and experience any sharp discomfort during stimulation Strong electromagnetic fields (electrosurgery/microwave cookers/mobile phones) may affect the correct operation of this unit. If it appears to behave unusually, move it away from these devices.

Warnings
 Before using the Viva pelvic floor exerciser please note the following warnings:
· Incontinence may have many causes. You should try to identify your type of incontinence and the cause before use.
· If you have a urinary infection or any skin irritations within the vagina, it is recommended not to use the stimulator.
· Care must be taken if you are not experiencing normal sensation or feeling in your vagina.
· If you suspect or have any form of prolapse you MUST consult your medical advisor before using the viva. (Exercise may help mild prolapse, but causing contractions may be inadvisable for severe prolapse).
· The Stainless Steel of the viva vaginal trainer contains 8% Nickel and 18% Chromium. Do not use the trainer if you are allergic to either of these metals.
NB: You may safely use the trainer during menstruation, although it may be a little less comfortable.

*Your healthcare professional will advise you whether this product is suitable for you/ your condition. Always read the label and instructions. Use only as directed. If symptoms persist see your healthcare professional.

**If you are wanting to claim a rebate on this product, please contact your Health Insurance Company prior to purchasing to see if online purchases are eligible, as we are not a Healthcare Provider.

How It Works ?

How does it work?

The Viva uses gentle electrical stimulation via a discreet tampon shaped trainer to locate and exercise the pelvic floor muscles for you using proven programme settings.
Viva works your muscle for you and helps to develop your own muscle control and is a perfect complement to voluntary pelvic floor (Kegel) exercises.
If used for 20 minutes a day over just a few weeks, the Viva may improve most levels of leakage and improve sexual intimacy.

Viva should not be used in cases of severe prolapse, or vaginal infection.
Viva may not be suitable for users with a pacemaker or a history of epilepsy.
If in doubt contact your medical adviser before using the Viva.

Select the right personal training programme for you:

Stress describes the involuntary leakage of urine when a person coughs, sneezes, strains or makes sudden movements. It is particularly common in women and occurs when the bladder neck and the other mechanisms that act to hold urine in the bladder are not working properly.

Urge describes an overactive bladder. A person may experience a strong and sudden urge to go to the toilet but are not always able to hold on, or have to go so frequently that it becomes inconvenient.

Mixed is a combination of both Stress and Urge

Advantages of using the viva

• It can be a Cure – not simply containment
• It is Drug Free with no side effects
• It is Safe and Easy to use
• It is Discreet
• It may help to avoid surgery and
• It may improve sexual intimacy

Specification

Content
Viva Pelvic Floor Trainer
1 x Viva Vaginal Probe (K-VIVA-T)
1 x Probe holder
2 x 1.5V Alkaline batteries
1 x CR2 Lithium battery (B-LICR2)
Instruction manual
White make-up style pouch with mirror

Questions

FAQ for this product

Why should I exercise my Pelvic Floor Muscles?

Pelvic floor exercises can strengthen and tone the muscle whilst also increasing the blood flow to this region.

Strong or toned pelvic floor muscles can support the extra weight of pregnancy, help in the second stage of labour and, by increasing circulation, assist in healing the perineum between the anus and vagina after birth.

When done regularly and correctly pelvic floor exercises can help to prevent stress incontinence, bladder weakness and prolapse in later life.

Another benefit of carrying out your pelvic floor exercises is that toned pelvic floor muscles can provide women within a greater level of satisfaction during sex, enabling them to experience orgasm.

Exercising and maintaining the strength of your pelvic floor is also important in reducing the symptoms of incontinence.

If you are struggling to complete pelvic floor exercises on your own, you can try using a pelvic floor muscle stimulator.

Pelvic Floor Stimulators send a gentle electrical signal through a vaginal or anal probe which stimulates the pelvic floor muscle, therefore exercising it for you. Results can often be seen and felt in as little as 3 weeks.

To see our range of pelvic floor exercisers and stimulators, please click here.

Why do the instructions say that I cannot use pelvic floor exercisers if I have been diagnosed or treated for cervical cancer?

No research has been published showing the effect of electric current on malignant or pre-cancerous cells, so we cannot quantify the risk.

Current professional advice (see www.electrotherapy.org) is that electrotherapy should not be used through malignant tissue.

If you are unsure, please contact your medical advisor.

Why do I keep getting the ‘LEADS’ message on my Pelvic Floor Exerciser?

Resolving ‘LEADS’ Message on your Pelvic Floor Exerciser

There are 2 main reasons why you may be getting the ‘LEADS’ message on your control unit:

1. Fault in the lead wires or probe connections

An intermittent break in the lead, or the short lead attached to the probe, could be the cause of your LEAD fault. You can purchase a replacement set of leads via the ‘Accessories‘ page.

2. You just aren’t the right shape for this probe

Peoples’ bodies vary. If there isn’t enough contact on the electrode plates the electric current cannot flow.

In this instance, you could try:

i) Using a water-based lubricant gel such as Go Gel to improve the contact.
ii) Try using a different probe: The Liberty Plus is 4mm wider providing better contact for some women.

No sensation and LEADS alarm showing.

Check lead and probe connection:

Dampen your hand with water and a little table salt. Squeeze the probe firmly in your hand and carefully increase the strength until you can feel something or LEADS alarm shows.
a) If you CAN’T feel anything, either the lead or the unit is faulty
b) If you CAN feel something on your hand, and the LEADS alarm does NOT show, then there is nothing wrong with the unit or lead.

The electrical conductivity of the vagina varies widely. The LEAD detection circuit in the product is there as a safety feature to ensure any rapid changes in connection cannot cause very uncomfortable, rapid changes in stimulation.
nfortunately this means that some users, who fall outside of the general range, may experience unwanted LEADS alarms.

If you experience unwanted LEADS alarm, please try:

i) Using a water–based lubricant which will improve conduction
ii) Purchasing a larger probe: the Liberty Plus probe is 4mm wider than the standard Liberty probe
iii) Crossing your legs and squeezing to increase pressure on the probe, which should improve the connection. If this enables you to use the unit, you should find that in a few weeks of stimulation the contact improves.

If none of the above solves your issue, then we are sorry to say that the unit will not work for you.

No sensation and no LEADS alarm
If you have tried the test above and DO have sensation when the probe is in your hand, then you may have reduced sensitivity due to previously damaged or desensitized pudendal nerves (this can happen in childbirth or some surgical procedures).
Please contact your GP for advice.

No sensation on one side
The current flows from one side of the probe to other, so it is not possible to have one side “not working”.
However, the strength of the sensation depends on how close to the nerve the current flows and also in which direction it flows relative to the nerve.
You can try slightly adjusting the position of the probe, or exchanging the connection of the wires in the probe.

ACCESSORIES
X-VP Liberty Vaginal probe 28mm
X-VPM Liberty Plus Vaginal Probe 32mm
X-VPG Liberty Gold Vaginal Probe 26mm
L-IT-1 Replacement lead for original iTouch Sure and Elise models (metal connection)
L-IT1-NEW Replacement lead for newer iTouch Sure and Elise models (plastic connection)
X-AP Anal probe
X-PR13 Smaller diameter probe
E-CM5050 Electrode pads 50x50mm
K-GO Go Gel Personal Lubricant
B-BL4B Li-ion battery

CHANGING THE LEAD
L-IT-1
Original Models
(Metal Connection)

L-IT1-NEW
Newer Models
(Plastic Connection)

Please note that the leads for the newer iTouch Sure and Elise units have a new plastic connecting plug, and the leads for the older iTouch Sure and Elise units have a metal connecting plug:

What strength should I use and how do I adjust the strength as my pelvic floor muscles improve?

The stronger the contraction, the more exercise you do and the faster the muscle will increase in strength. The sensory nerves are more sensitive than the motor nerves, so you will need to feel the stimulation quite strongly to be sure to exercise the muscle properly.

In principle, you should turn up the strength as high as you can stand it. You should at least feel the muscle start to pull upwards, this is a good level at which to start your first session. However, when you first start exercising any muscle strongly, you may get aches afterwards.

If you don’t work the muscles, you won’t get aches but you won’t get results either. When you are starting, it’s best to set the strength quite high, but limit the length of the session to five or ten minutes.

If you don’t get aches the next day, you can gradually increase the strength and duration. As the muscle strengthens you will find that you can increase strength and duration. If you set the strength much too high, you might strain a muscle and the discomfort could take several days to fade away.

People vary in sensitivity to electrostimulation – there are lots of variables that can affect what you feel – however most people won’t feel much below about 20.0, and some will use the maximum 99.5.

Before your first use, try moistening the probe, holding it in your hand, and adjusting the strength to see what it feels like – remembering that your hand is actually much more sensitive than your pelvic floor.

Customer Feedback:

“As a middle aged woman who’s had surgery & takes prescribed meds for incontinence (both without 100% success), this was a last-ditch attempt for which I didn’t have any great hopes. I’m delighted to say I was wrong – only a few weeks in, & the difference is notable. I’ve stopped taking my meds & don’t need to wear pads every day. After experimenting, I’ve discovered that, for me, the MIXED programme is much less effective. Although it’s recommended for cases of urge & stress (like mine) I’ve got much better results from a daily session of URGE followed by one of STRESS. I’ve made it part of my nightly routine – I use the exerciser while I’m reading in bed before sleeping – so it doesn’t intrude on my life. DO heed the instructions to start at a low setting if you don’t have much sensation in the pelvic floor – sensation will come back really quickly & then you can build up the power setting. Learn from my mistake: I was impatient & started off much too high – & the resulting strained muscles meant I had what felt like really bad period pains the next day.”

If you have any questions regarding intensity and strength settings, please contact us.

What position is best when using Pelvic Floor Exercisers?

You can use it in any position, but most people would find it more comfortable reclining on the sofa or lying in bed with the knees slightly drawn up.

You can also lie on your side with a pillow between your knees if you find it more comfortable.

It is important to find a comfortable position before beginning your 20 minute sessions.

Positioning_0

What is Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) and what causes it?

Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) occurs when there is sudden pressure (“stress”) placed on the bladder.

When the pelvic floor muscles become weakened (due to childbirth, aging or obesity) they are less able to cope with these sudden pressures and therefore allow leakages of urine when you cough, laugh, sneeze or exercise.

The pelvic floor muscles are a group of muscles that wrap around the underside of the bladder and rectum which hold your organs in place. When these muscles become weakened, they struggle to cope with the pressure placed on them by your organs, causing leaks from the bladder (or even the bowel) when you cough, laugh, sneeze or exercise.

SUI is the most common form of incontinence in women.

Pelvic floor exercisers work to strengthen and tone your pelvic floor muscle to improve its condition and enable it to cope with these sudden pressures once again.

Our range of pelvic floor exercisers come with clinically proven Stress programmes to target SUI.

Please click here to see our range.

What is my Pelvic Floor?

Your pelvic floor (pubococcygeal or PC) muscles are responsible for holding the bladder, womb and bowel in place and for controlling the muscles that control the anus, vagina and urethra.

Located at the base of your pelvis, the pelvic floor consists of a deep muscle layer and a superficial muscle layer. These work together to keep all of your pelvic organs healthy.

The muscles form a figure-of-eight stretching between the pubic bone at the front and your coccyx or tailbone at the rear. The urethra and vagina pass through the front hole and the rectum through the rear.

Pelvic Floor Muscles diagram

What is Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome?>

What is IC / PBS?

Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a condition that results in recurring discomfort or pain in the bladder and the surrounding pelvic region. People may experience mild discomfort, pressure, tenderness, or intense pain in the bladder and pelvic area. Symptoms may include an urgent need to urinate (urgency), a frequent need to urinate (frequency), or a combination of these symptoms. Pain may change in intensity as the bladder fills with urine or as it empties. Women’s symptoms often worsen during menstruation. They may sometimes experience pain with vaginal intercourse..IC / PBS is far more common in women than in men.

What causes IC?

Some of the symptoms of IC / PBS resemble those of bacterial infection, but medical tests reveal no organisms in the urine of patients with IC / PBS. Furthermore, patients with IC / PBS do not respond to antibiotic therapy. Researchers are working to understand the causes of IC / PBS and to find effective treatments.

In recent years, researchers have isolated a substance found almost exclusively in the urine of people with interstitial cystitis. They have named the substance antiproliferative factor, or APF, because it appears to block the normal growth of the cells that line the inside wall of the bladder. Researchers anticipate that learning more about APF will lead to a greater understanding of the causes of IC and to possible treatments.

Researchers are beginning to explore the possibility that heredity may play a part in some forms of IC. In a few cases, IC has affected a mother and a daughter or two sisters, but it does not commonly run in families.

How is IC / PBS diagnosed?

Because symptoms are similar to those of other disorders of the urinary bladder and because there is no definitive test to identify IC / PBS, doctors must rule out other treatable conditions before considering a diagnosis of IC / PBS. The most common of these diseases in both genders are urinary tract infections and bladder cancer. IC / PBS is not associated with any increased risk in developing cancer. In men, common diseases include chronic prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

The diagnosis of IC / PBS in the general population is based on

  • Presence of pain related to the bladder, usually accompanied by frequency and urgency
  • Absence of other diseases that could cause the symptoms

Diagnostic tests that help in ruling out other diseases include urinalysis, urine culture, cystoscopy, biopsy of the bladder wall, distention of the bladder under anesthesia, urine cytology, and laboratory examination of prostate secretions.

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